Help! I Need to Buy a New Caravan Water Tank!

Author: Tahlia Maynard   Date Posted:3 October 2016 

You’re lounging in an armchair and enjoying the hot, summer sun when suddenly you feel a tickle in your throat. Starting to feel the sensation of thirst begin to form in your mouth, you stand to go get a glass of water. Upon reaching your caravan’s sink, you turn the handle and are surprised to find that absolutely nothing comes out. You, my friend, have forgotten to purchase a caravan water tank. 

Although a caravan water tank may seem like a pretty basic accessory, the current market models do vary on a few factors which should be considered upon purchasing. Here are the most important: 

What Size?
Although it’s pretty obvious that a larger water tank will hold more water, some anxious campers gloss over how their water tank size will dictate their camping experience. Here are a few things to think about: 

Short or Long Trips?
On longer camping trips, a larger water tank would be a better choice than a small one. On shorter trips, a smaller tank may be adequate.

Off-the-Grid or Local?
If you’re interested in off-the-grid, secluded camping, then a larger water tank would likely be ideal. Larger water tanks, however, are heavier and bigger than their smaller-sized counterparts and often require a larger mounting area.
Campers who enjoy frequenting parks featuring water hookups are usually okay with a smaller tank because it’s easier for them to refill with an easily accessible water source nearby.

Number of People?
A single camper will likely require much less water than a full-sized family with children. The number of people who camp with you will affect the size of the water tank you need.

To help give you a better idea: 

NOTE: Each litre of water will add 1kg to your caravan’s weight. If adding numerous large tanks, be sure to disperse them evenly underneath the vehicle to keep the caravan from becoming unbalanced.
What’s the Tank Made of?
Most caravan water tanks are manufactured using one of the following materials: 
•    Polyethylene plastic 
•    Galvanised Steel 
•    PVC and Nylon

Polyethylene, with its light weight and impressive flexibility, is one of the most commonly-used water tank materials. These tanks are 100% food-grade approved and their light weight makes them ideal for use on smaller caravans with flimsier walls. 

Galvanised steel water tanks weigh much more than polyethylene models but are much easier to repair if damaged. Because these tanks are resilient to corrosion, they are perfect for campers who often find themselves in wetter environments or near water. 

PVC and nylon water tanks are soft-sided, bladder system tanks. Although the polyethylene and steel tanks are generally considered more durable, PVC and nylon present a convenient and easily portable option.